Lake Oroville is 99% full. That’s why the water managers say it won’t overflow

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As of Tuesday, Lake Oroville is at 99 percent capacity, with more than 3.5 million feet of water stored. According to the Department of Water Resources, Lake Oroville hasn’t been this full at this point of the year since 2012. Because more snow melts from the Sierra, more water flows into the lake than is released, meaning the level some water is slowly continuing to creep in. Water managers from the Department of Water Resources say that despite continued snowmelt, there is no reason to worry about Lake Oroville overflowing. Our peak inflow occurred in April of this year. And we’ve seen that inflow has basically decreased since that time,” says John Yarbrough, assistant deputy director of the State Water Project. Even if inflows were to remain steady, without an increase in releases, Lake Oroville would still take nearly three weeks to fill. fully. But Yarbrough says inflows will decrease overall through June. So with this inflow decreasing, we’ve been able to look at that and see any changes that come on the horizon and then adjust our outflows accordingly,” Yarbrough said. In the event of a major heat wave or rare late-season storm, Yarbrough said there would be plenty of time to temporarily ramp up releases to keep pace with increased inflows while maintaining a safe water level. During the summer months, more releases are made from Lake Oroville as the demand for stored water increases. Lake Oroville is the largest reservoir in the State Water Project, providing clean water to 27 million Californians. Water delivery releases lower the level of Lake Oroville during the fall. DWR announced in April that because Lake Oroville and other major reservoirs are full, the State Water Project will supply 100 percent of water requests this year. It hasn’t happened since 2006. | Videos below | Meteorologist Heather Waldman joins LiveCopter 3 at Lake Oroville, Feather Falls

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As of Tuesday, Lake Oroville is at 99 percent capacity, with more than 3.5 million feet of water stored.

According to the Department of Water Resources, Lake Oroville hasn’t been this full at this point of the year since 2012.

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As more snow melts from the Sierra, more water flows into the lake than is released, meaning the water level continues to slowly rise.

Water managers from the Department of Water Resources say that despite continued snowmelt, there is no reason to worry about Lake Oroville overflowing.

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Our peak inflow occurred in April of this year. And we’ve seen basically that the inflow has decreased since that time,” says John Yarbrough, assistant deputy director of the State Water Project.

Even if inflows were to remain steady, without an increase in releases, it would still take Lake Oroville nearly three weeks to fill completely. But Yarbrough says inflows will decline overall through June.

So with that inflow diminishing, we’ve been able to look at that and see any changes that are coming over the horizon and then adjust our outflows accordingly,” Yarbrough said.

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In the event of a major heat wave or rare late-season storm, Yarbrough said there would be plenty of time to temporarily ramp up releases to keep pace with increased inflows while maintaining a safe water level.

During the summer months, more releases are made from Lake Oroville as the demand for stored water increases. Lake Oroville is the largest reservoir in the State Water Project, providing clean water to 27 million Californians. Water delivery releases lower the level of Lake Oroville during the fall.

DWR announced in April that because Lake Oroville and other major reservoirs are full, the State Water Project would meet 100 percent of water demands this year. It hasn’t happened since 2006.

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| Videos below | Meteorologist Heather Waldman joins LiveCopter 3 at Lake Oroville, Feather Falls

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